North American Catalysis Society Awards and Process

Awards pre­sented by the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Society

 
The North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety spon­sors six pres­ti­gious awards and lec­ture­ships to rec­og­nize the accom­plish­ments of catal­y­sis sci­en­tists and to pro­mote the advance­ment of catal­y­sis sci­ence in North Amer­ica and world-wide. These awards are described in the NACS web site (http://www.nacatsoc.org/awards_desc.asp).

Three of these awards include ple­nary lec­tures at NACS bian­nual meet­ings (Eugene J. Houdry Award in Applied Catal­y­sis, Paul H. Emmett Award in Fun­da­men­tal Catal­y­sis, Michel Boudart Award for the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis, the lat­ter jointly pre­sented with the Euro­pean Fed­er­a­tion of Catal­y­sis Soci­eties). The F.G. Cia­petta and Robert Bur­well Lec­ture­ships in Catal­y­sis involve lec­tures at local club meet­ings and the pre­sen­ta­tion of the awards at the NACS meet­ing ban­quet. The NACS Award for Dis­tin­guished Ser­vice in the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis is the most recent recog­ni­tion insti­tuted by the Soci­ety. All of these awards are pre­sented every two years and the nom­i­na­tion dead­lines are listed in the NACS web site.

Can­vass­ing and Nom­i­na­tion Processes

 
NACS encour­ages all nom­i­na­tions for these awards and nom­i­na­tors and nom­i­nees need not be NACS mem­bers. The Pres­i­dent instructs the Vice Pres­i­dent to form a can­vass­ing com­mit­tee for each cycle of every award to ensure a full slate of out­stand­ing can­di­dates. This com­mit­tee is led by the NACS Vice-President and con­sists of pre­vi­ous award recip­i­ents and rec­og­nized experts within the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity at-large. The com­mit­tee iden­ti­fies wor­thy can­di­dates and its Chair seeks nom­i­na­tors for these can­di­dates, but pro­vides no spe­cific guid­ance about the prepa­ra­tion of the nom­i­na­tion pack­ages beyond that pro­vided on the NACS web site. The Chair also instructs the Sec­re­tary to con­tact all NACS local rep­re­sen­ta­tives to request that they can­vass for nom­i­na­tions within their local sec­tions. All nom­i­na­tion dead­lines and cycles are also announced in the quar­terly NACS newsletter.

Award Recip­i­ent Nom­i­na­tion Process

 
The jury that selects each NACS award recip­i­ent con­sists of sci­en­tists and engi­neers rec­og­nized as experts and rep­re­sent­ing indus­try, acad­e­mia, and national labs. The mem­bers of this jury must have no affil­i­a­tion with any of the nom­i­nees and are specif­i­cally asked to dis­close any con­flicts of inter­est and to dis­qual­ify them­selves with­out prej­u­dice when a con­flict exists. The selec­tion jury is appointed by the NACS Pres­i­dent, who seeks guid­ance in select­ing its mem­bers from the Vice Pres­i­dent and from senior mem­bers of the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity. The iden­tity of the jury mem­bers is kept in the strictest con­fi­dence and known only to the Pres­i­dent; the mem­bers are also required to keep their par­tic­i­pa­tion in these com­mit­tees confidential.

The NACS Pres­i­dent pro­vides the jury with the nom­i­na­tion pack­ages for all can­di­dates within two weeks of the dead­line; in the inter­ven­ing time, poten­tial jury mem­bers are asked about their will­ing­ness to serve. The mem­bers of the jury rank the can­di­dates and pro­vide spe­cific details for their selec­tion in the case of the top three can­di­dates. In some cases, jury mem­bers are asked to again rank the top two can­di­dates side-by-side, after con­sid­er­ing their respec­tive nom­i­na­tion pack­ages once again.

The recip­i­ent of the Award and his/her nom­i­na­tors are informed of the deci­sion of the jury, fol­lowed by noti­fi­ca­tion of jury mem­bers and of nom­i­na­tors of the other can­di­dates. A for­mal announce­ment, com­posed by the Pres­i­dent in con­sul­ta­tion with the recip­i­ent and the nom­i­na­tor, is pub­lished in the NACS web site and the NACS newslet­ter and soon there­after in Chem­i­cal and Engi­neer­ing News. The awards are all pre­sented at the bien­nial NACS meet­ing, where the respec­tive cita­tions are read and the award win­ners receive a plaque.

The NACS com­mu­nity at-large deserves con­grat­u­la­tions and thanks for the excel­lent cadre of nom­i­nees that it has put forth and cho­sen and for their ded­i­ca­tion as nom­i­na­tors and as mem­bers of the jury.
 
Thanks,
 
Enrique Igle­sia
Pres­i­dent
 
Bruce Cook
Vice President

7th International Symposium on Acid-Base Catalysis (ABC-7)

On behalf of the orga­niz­ing com­mit­tee, I am pleased to announce the 7th Inter­na­tional Sym­po­sium on Acid-Base Catal­y­sis (ABC-7), which will be held from May 12 to May 15,  2013 at Shi­na­gawa, Tokyo, Japan.

The ABC is a suc­cess­ful series of sym­posia. The 7th ABC will pro­vide a forum for sci­en­tists and engi­neers from both acad­e­mia and indus­try to dis­cuss most recent devel­op­ments and tech­no­log­i­cal oppor­tu­ni­ties in this vibrant area of research as well as the past ABC sym­posia, pro­mot­ing a global and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary approach towards both fun­da­men­tal sci­ence and indus­trial appli­ca­tions of acid-base catal­y­sis. We hope many peo­ple engag­ing in the acid-base catal­y­sis field par­tic­i­pate in ABC-7.

The sci­en­tific activ­i­ties of the sym­po­sium will be held at TKP Gar­den City Shi­na­gawa, which is in front of Shi­na­gawa Sta­tion in Tokyo. This area has good access to Narita Inter­na­tional Air­port (total time: 70~80 min.) and Haneda Air­port (Tokyo Inter­na­tional air­port) (total time: 15~20 min.).

On detailed infor­ma­tion on abstract sub­mis­sion, reg­is­tra­tion, access to the con­fer­ence venue, and sci­en­tific pro­grams, please visit our web­site. http://www.shokubai.org/abc/index.html

Please note the dead­line for abstract sub­mis­sion is Novem­ber 16, 2012.

Now you can find the titles of Ple­nary and Keynote Lec­tures on the web­site. We look for­ward to meet­ing you at the sym­po­sium.
 
Best regards,
 
Takashi Tat­sumi
Chair­man of ABC-7
 
Michikazu Hara
Gen­eral sec­re­tary of ABC-7

Travel Grants for Attendance at the International Congress on Catalysis

The Soci­ety grate­fully acknowl­edged the finan­cial sup­port of DOE, NSF, BASF, BP, Süd-Chemie, and Dow for travel sup­port for catal­y­sis researchers from the United States, Canada and Mex­ico to attend the ICC meet­ing in Munich.

Travel assis­tance was pro­vided to:

  • Young fac­ulty in a tenure-track posi­tion (Aditya Bahn, Cathy Chin, Phillip Christo­pher, Steven Cross­ley, Lars Grabow, Simon Pod­kolzin, Carsten Siev­ers, Yyriy Roman)
  • Post-doctoral fel­lows (David Fla­herty, Mon­ica Gar­cia, Raja­mani Gounder, Jan Kopy­scin­ski, Alexan­der Okrut, Far­naz Sotoodeh, Alek­san­dra Vojvodic).
  • Grad­u­ate stu­dents, all of whom received par­tial sup­port from the indus­trial spon­sor and car­ried a named fel­low­ship designation:
    1. BASF Fel­lows (Andrew Fos­ter, Samia Ilias, Amber Janda, Matthew Mon­te­more, Simon Pang, Natalie Ray, Di Wu)
    2. BP Fel­lows (Maria Teran and Vic­to­ria Whiffen)
    3. Dow Fel­lows (Matthew Boucher, John Copeland, Shan­non Klaus, Wen-Sheng Lee, Michael Nigra, Jing Lu, and Dario Prieto).

The selec­tion com­mit­tee mem­bers were Jing­guang Chen (Chair), Bruce Cook, Enrique Igle­sia and Israel Wachs.

2012 Eni Prize to Catalysis Researcher

Professor Enrique Iglesia

Pro­fes­sor Enrique Iglesia

Pro­fes­sor Enrique Igle­sia has received the 2012 Eni Prize “New Fron­tiers of Hydro­car­bons” for the devel­op­ment of hydro­car­bon syn­the­sis cat­a­lysts which improve process effi­ciency and reduce waste and energy use.
 
Please use the links below for addi­tional infor­ma­tion:
 
2012 Eni Awards
Press Releases
2012 Win­ners
Prof. Igle­sia Biography

International Precious Metals Institute Henry J. Albert Award to Professor Fabio Ribeiro

Pro­fes­sor Fabio Ribeiro of the Depart­ment of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Pur­due Uni­ver­sity has been named the recip­i­ent of the 2012 Inter­na­tional Pre­cious Met­als Insti­tute Henry J. Albert Award, spon­sored by BASF Cor­po­ra­tion, in recog­ni­tion of his out­stand­ing the­o­ret­i­cal and exper­i­men­tal con­tri­bu­tions to the sci­ence and tech­nol­ogy of pre­cious met­als. His research group com­bines mea­sure­ments on real­is­tic dis­persed clus­ters and flat model sys­tems with pre­ci­sion and reli­a­bil­ity at the state-of-the-art. He has pro­vided the kinetic data set for water-gas shift that rep­re­sents the stan­dard used by oth­ers in bench­mark­ing of other mate­ri­als and of the­o­ret­i­cal esti­mates. This work has also demon­strated the strong effects of sup­ports in the acti­va­tion of water in water-gas shift and that all exposed sur­face atoms are active on Pt clus­ters but only cor­ner atoms with low coor­di­na­tion are active on Au clus­ters. His sem­i­nal stud­ies of NOx reac­tions have unveiled the mech­a­nism of NO oxi­da­tion and pro­vided ele­gant exam­ples of the use of spec­tro­scopic and kinetic tools in unrav­el­ing the com­plex path­ways in NOx trap­ping on Ba-promoted Pt/alumina sys­tems. His group con­tin­ues to expand the exper­i­men­tal fron­tiers with recent devel­op­ments X-ray absorp­tion spec­troscopy dur­ing catal­y­sis at high pres­sures in liq­uid and gaseous media, with infrared analy­sis of adsorbed species dur­ing iso­topic tran­sients, and with state-of-the-art envi­ron­men­tal trans­mis­sion elec­tron microscopy. These suc­cesses build on his ear­lier stud­ies of Pd cat­a­lysts which defined the reac­tion path­ways involved in cat­alytic com­bus­tion of methane and in cat­alytic hydrodechlo­ri­na­tion of a wide range of hydrochlo­ro­flu­o­ro­car­bon molecules.

 

In Memoriam: Michel Boudart (1924–2012)

Michel Boudart, chem­i­cal engi­neer and expert in catal­y­sis, dies at 87 Pro­fes­sor Boudart taught at Prince­ton and Berke­ley but was best known for his five decades at the heart of the Depart­ment of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Stan­ford. His influ­ence shaped catal­y­sis dur­ing the post-­‐war period when energy, defense and space indus­tries demanded a deeper under­stand­ing of chem­i­cal reac­tions.
 
By Andrew Myers
 
Michel Boudart, a pro­fes­sor emer­i­tus of chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing at Stan­ford Uni­ver­sity and for five decades one of the world’s lead­ing experts in catal­y­sis, died May 2 at an assisted liv­ing cen­ter in Palo Alto, Cal­i­for­nia, of mul­ti­ple organ fail­ure. He was 87.

Boudart was the first William M. Keck, Sr. Pro­fes­sor of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing and one of a very few indi­vid­u­als who were respon­si­ble for estab­lish­ing the rep­u­ta­tion of Stanford’s chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing depart­ment. The cen­tral theme of his research was the cat­alytic prop­er­ties of met­als, par­tic­u­larly small metal particles.

Boudart essen­tially brought catal­y­sis, as a sci­ence, to chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing in the United States. He was an inter­na­tional ambas­sador for the field over his entire career.

Michel Boudart was a world renowned and influ­en­tial expert in the field of catal­y­sis who brought the Stan­ford Uni­ver­sity chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing to promi­nence and trained sev­eral decades of stu­dents,” said Andreas Acrivos, a fel­low pro­fes­sor at Stan­ford and now pro­fes­sor emer­i­tus both at Stan­ford and at the City Col­lege of CUNY. “He left a legacy that would be dif­fi­cult to replicate.”

As a pro­fes­sor, Boudart super­vised what was con­sis­tently one of the larger groups of PhD can­di­dates in the depart­ment, even­tu­ally guid­ing over 70 doc­toral can­di­dates to their degrees and men­tor­ing over 100 post-­‐doctoral can­di­dates and vis­it­ing sci­en­tists. The dias­pora of his for­mer stu­dents would go on to lead and shape the field.

Le plus de saveur

 
An avid inter­na­tional trav­eller, Boudart and his wife, Marina, boasted friends across the world. His office sported Japan­ese shoji screens, abstract prints, and over­stuffed sofas and – occu­py­ing one entire wall – an immense peri­odic table of the ele­ments, printed in Russ­ian, which he read with ease.

In a brief biog­ra­phy, Boudart cited as his per­sonal phi­los­o­phy a quote from French lit­er­ary the­o­rist Roland Barthes: “Nul pou­voir, un peu de savoir, un peu de sagesse, et le plus de saveur pos­si­ble.” Trans­lated loosely, it reads: “No power, a lit­tle knowl­edge, a lit­tle wis­dom, and as much fla­vor as pos­si­ble.” In this con­text, he will always be remem­bered as a man of real per­sonal charisma and, one of the last “gen­tle­man scientists.”

Catal­y­sis is the study of chem­i­cal processes by which one sub­stance, the cat­a­lyst, pro­motes a reac­tion between other sub­stances with­out itself chang­ing.
It is fun­da­men­tal to the chem­i­cal, petro­leum and phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal indus­tries, among many others.

In the post-­‐war era, the United States became the acknowl­edged leader in the field, mostly owing to advances flow­ing out of Amer­i­can acad­e­mia and indus­try. Boudart was at the cen­ter of it all. He was an unabashed cham­pion of catal­y­sis. Though the field is obscure to most lay audi­ences, catal­y­sis has a pro­found impact on our world and how we live.

In a pub­lished inter­view, Boudart once laid out his case: With­out catal­y­sis, he said, “[o]ur satel­lites could not be maneu­vered, our autos would pour out all the nox­ious chem­i­cals we’ve spent years guard­ing against. Our tele­phone links with the rest of the world would be seri­ously impeded.”

In 1975, in the wake of the first oil cri­sis, Boudart and two asso­ciates founded Cat­alyt­ica in Santa Clara, Cal­i­for­nia, which worked on highly com­plex cat­alytic prob­lems for petro­chem­i­cal, chem­i­cal, and phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal firms as well as gov­ern­ment agen­cies. He served as a con­sul­tant to numer­ous well-­‐known companies.

[Cat­alyt­ica] started in the catal­y­sis con­sult­ing field, a ser­vice made clearly nec­es­sary by the oil cri­sis,” Boudart said at the time. “One of the crit­i­cal areas was in syn­thetic fuels.”

Guid­ing force
Acco­lades and awards were show­ered on Boudart through­out his life, but par­tic­u­larly in the later years of his career, when the scale of his impact became clear.

In 1985, the Uni­ver­sity of Utah hosted a five-­‐day sym­po­sium on catal­y­sis solely in Boudart’s honor. In 2004, the Jour­nal of Phys­i­cal Chem­istry ded­i­cated an entire issue to Boudart’s legacy.

In their intro­duc­tion, the journal’s edi­tors wrote, “Michel Boudart has been the guid­ing force in the field of het­ero­ge­neous catal­y­sis for more than forty years. He was known for ele­gantly stated con­cepts and his elu­ci­da­tion of cat­alytic sites, his exper­i­men­tal stud­ies of new cat­alytic mate­ri­als, and the activ­i­ties of [his] many stu­dents and collaborators …”

The jour­nal cited his fore­most achieve­ment as the quan­tifi­ca­tion of catal­y­sis as rig­or­ous sequences of ele­men­tary steps. He focused atten­tion on the need to report reac­tion rates eval­u­ated under the most rig­or­ous assess­ment tech­niques avail­able and he intro­duced the con­cept of turnover rate – the num­ber of mol­e­cules con­verted per site per sec­ond. He then per­fected pre­cise pro­to­cols for accu­rate mea­sure­ment of reactions.

Boudart’s insis­tence on rig­or­ous col­lec­tion and report­ing of data proved invalu­able in com­par­ing data gen­er­ated by dif­fer­ent lab­o­ra­to­ries through­out the world and enabled many sub­se­quent advances in the field. His vision, lead­er­ship, and wis­dom were cred­ited as a major force in bring­ing catal­y­sis to a point where the design of spe­cific cat­alytic mate­ri­als for envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion, pro­duc­tion of chem­i­cals, and energy con­ver­sion processes became possible.

In 2006, the Dan­ish com­pany Hal­dor Top­søe spon­sored The Michel Boudart Award for the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis, which is admin­is­tered jointly by the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety and the Euro­pean Fed­er­a­tion of Catal­y­sis Societies.

Pro­found legacy

 
Michel Boudart was born on 18 June 1924 in Brus­sels, Bel­gium. In 1940, as Hitler’s Panzer divi­sions blitzkrieged his home­land, Boudart was just 16. He had been accepted to the Uni­ver­sity of Lou­vain, but the uni­ver­sity was closed due to the war.

In order not to be drafted or sent to Ger­man fac­to­ries, Boudart worked as a vol­un­teer stretcher-­‐bearer for the Red Cross. Mean­while, he had pri­vate tutor­ing to pre­pare for Lou­vain. When the uni­ver­sity reopened, Boudart grad­u­ated in three years at the top of every class, save math­e­mat­ics, where he was out­done only by his dear friend, the late Pro­fes­sor Rene de Voge­laere of the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, Berkeley.

Boudart earned his B.S. at the Uni­ver­sity of Lou­vain in 1944 and his M.S. in 1947. He then left Bel­gium to attend Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity, where he took his PhD in chem­istry in 1950. “He and his wife Marina were born in Bel­gium and were knighted by the crown, but Amer­ica was their adopted home,” said Acrivos. “Their chil­dren are thor­oughly American.”

After earn­ing his doc­tor­ate, Boudart held fac­ulty posi­tions at Prince­ton until 1961 and, for three years, at Berke­ley, before join­ing the Stan­ford fac­ulty in 1964. He was Chair of the Depart­ment of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Stan­ford from 1975 to 1978. He also held vis­it­ing pro­fes­sor­ships at the Uni­ver­si­ties of Lou­vain, Rio de Janeiro, Tokyo, and Paris. He became pro­fes­sor emer­i­tus in 1994.

Boudart authored or coau­thored over 280 jour­nal arti­cles and served on the edi­to­r­ial boards of at least ten jour­nals. His book, Kinet­ics of Chem­i­cal Processes, is a stan­dard ref­er­ence and was trans­lated into Japan­ese, Span­ish, and French. His book, Kinet­ics of Het­ero­ge­neous Cat­alytic Processes, writ­ten with G. Djega-­‐Mariadassou, was pub­lished in French in 1982 and trans­lated to Eng­lish in 1984. He was coeditor-­‐ in-­‐chief of Catal­y­sis Sci­ence and Engi­neer­ing, a series of twelve volumes.

Boudart was recip­i­ent of numer­ous awards, among them the Wil­helm Award in Chem­i­cal Reac­tion Engi­neer­ing from the Amer­i­can Insti­tute of Chem­i­cal Engi­neers (1974), the Kendall Award (1977) and the Mur­phee Award (1985) from the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Soci­ety, and the Chem­i­cal Pio­neer Award (1991) of the Amer­i­can Insti­tute of Chemists.

His elec­tion to both the National Acad­emy of Sci­ence and the National Acad­emy of Engi­neer­ing were reflec­tions of Boudart’s lead­er­ship and his sci­en­tific grav­i­tas. He was like­wise a Fel­low of the Amer­i­can Asso­ci­a­tion for the Advance­ment of Sci­ence, the Amer­i­can Acad­emy of Arts and Sci­ences, and the Cal­i­for­nia Acad­emy of Sci­ences. He was a for­eign mem­ber of the Acad­e­mia Royale des Sci­ences, des Let­tres et des Beaux-­‐Arts de Bel­gique and its Royal Bel­gian Acad­emy Coun­cil for Applied Sciences.

Boudart received hon­orary doc­tor­ates from the Uni­ver­sity of Liege, the Uni­ver­sity of Notre Dame, the Uni­ver­sity of Ghent, and the Insti­tut National Poly­tech­nique de Lorraine.

He held four patents

 
Boudart is sur­vived by a daugh­ter, Iris Har­ris, of Whit­tier, Calif.; three sons, Marc, of Aptos, Calif.; Bau­douin, of Ather­ton, Calif; and Philip, of Palo Alto; and grand­chil­dren Marina and Clint Har­ris; and Jesse, Louise, and Noella Boudart. His wife, Marina d’Haese Boudart, died in 2009. A sec­ond daugh­ter, Dominique, died in child­hood.
 
Down­load PDF doc­u­ment: Michel Boudart Obituary

John Armor is the recipient of the 2012 NACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Catalysis

John Armor

Dr. John N. Armor has been selected as the recip­i­ent of the 2012 NACS Award for Dis­tin­guished Ser­vice in the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis. The Award is pre­sented every two years to rec­og­nize an indi­vid­ual who has advanced cat­alytic chem­istry or engi­neer­ing through both sig­nif­i­cant ser­vice to the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity and out­stand­ing tech­ni­cal accom­plish­ments. This award includes an hon­o­rar­ium ($5,000) and a plaque. It is awarded by the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety and spon­sored by Exxon­Mo­bil and Clari­ant and will be pre­sented dur­ing the 2013 NAM in Louisville.

This award rec­og­nizes Dr. Armor’s ded­i­ca­tion to the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity through his lead­er­ship in the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety, the New York Acad­emy of Sci­ences, and the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Soci­ety and in the orga­ni­za­tion of inter­na­tional sym­posia and con­fer­ences. He has served the North Amer­ica Catal­y­sis Soci­ety as Pres­i­dent and Trea­surer for more than two decades and dur­ing his tenure strength­ened the finan­cial and tech­ni­cal under­pin­nings of the Soci­ety, the qual­ity and rigor or its meet­ings, and the scope and reach of its edu­ca­tional activ­i­ties. He has brought enhanced recog­ni­tion to mem­bers of the Soci­ety and a brighter future to the dis­ci­pline through his artic­u­late advo­cacy of catal­y­sis and his lead­er­ship in strength­en­ing the involve­ment of stu­dents and young prac­ti­tion­ers in the activ­i­ties of the Society.

Dr. Armor has served the com­mu­nity well as a teacher and as a vision­ary leader, while con­tribut­ing as an inde­pen­dent sci­en­tist and a suc­cess­ful men­tor and research man­ager in indus­trial set­tings. His tech­ni­cal con­tri­bu­tions have been rec­og­nized with the Eugene J. Houdry Award of the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety and with the E. V. Mur­phree Award of the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Soci­ety. He has served as Edi­tor of Applied Catal­y­sis and Cat­Tech and has served on the edi­to­r­ial board of the lead­ing jour­nal in catal­y­sis. He has authored many com­pre­hen­sive reviews of cat­alytic tech­nolo­gies, often with insight­ful his­tor­i­cal per­spec­tives and always with a clear strate­gic vision.

 

In Memoriam: Edmond I. Ko (1952–2012)

Edmond Ko

Edmond Ko was Direc­tor of the Cen­ter for Engi­neer­ing Edu­ca­tion Inno­va­tion and Adjunct Pro­fes­sor of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at The Hong Kong Uni­ver­sity of Sci­ence and Tech­nol­ogy (HKUST). Prior to that, he served as Vice– Pres­i­dent (Under­grad­u­ate Edu­ca­tion), Dean of Stu­dents, and Pro­fes­sor (Chair) of Chem­istry at City Uni­ver­sity of Hong Kong (CityU), and as the Vice Provost for Edu­ca­tion and Pro­fes­sor of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Carnegie Mel­lon Uni­ver­sity. Pro­fes­sor Ko received his B.S. in Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing from the Uni­ver­sity of Wisconsin-Madison and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing from Stan­ford Uni­ver­sity. He worked as a Research Fel­low at the Cor­po­rate Research Lab­o­ra­tory of Exxon (1975–76) and held vis­it­ing and guest fac­ulty appoint­ments at the Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley (1987–88), the Hong Kong Uni­ver­sity of Sci­ence and Tech­nol­ogy (1995), Cal­i­for­nia Insti­tute of Tech­nol­ogy (1996) and Tian­jin Uni­ver­sity (since 2002).

Besides being the co-author of over 100 pub­li­ca­tions and co-inventor of one U.S. patent in the area of sur­face sci­ence and catal­y­sis, Pro­fes­sor Ko was an accom­plished edu­ca­tor. He received nine teach­ing awards in his career, includ­ing the William H. and Frances S. Ryan Teach­ing Award at Carnegie Mel­lon, the Chem­i­cal Man­u­fac­tur­ers Asso­ci­a­tion National Cat­a­lyst Award, the W. M. Keck Foun­da­tion Engi­neer­ing Teach­ing Excel­lence Award, the W. E. Wick­enden Award of the Amer­i­can Soci­ety for Engi­neer­ing Edu­ca­tion, and the School of Engi­neer­ing Teach­ing Award at HKUST.

Pro­fes­sor Ko had nine years of aca­d­e­mic admin­is­tra­tive expe­ri­ence, with the first two at Carnegie Mel­lon and the last seven at CityU. As the key per­son charged to improve edu­ca­tion at these two insti­tu­tions, he directed activ­i­ties in stu­dent recruit­ment and admis­sions, stu­dent devel­op­ment, stu­dent res­i­dence, cur­ricu­lum design, qual­ity assur­ance, and fac­ulty devel­op­ment. He was par­tic­u­larly inter­ested in devel­op­ing an outcome-based approach to enhance stu­dent learning.

Serv­ing as Chair­man of the Cur­ricu­lum Devel­op­ment Coun­cil and a mem­ber of the Qual­ity Assur­ance Coun­cil of the Uni­ver­sity Grants Com­mit­tee, Edu­ca­tion Com­mis­sion, and Advi­sory Com­mit­tee on Teacher Edu­ca­tion and Qual­i­fi­ca­tions of the HKSAR Gov­ern­ment, Pro­fes­sor Ko was deeply involved in the for­mu­la­tion and imple­men­ta­tion of edu­ca­tion poli­cies in Hong Kong at all lev­els. He was also a coun­cil mem­ber of the Hong Kong Coun­cil for Accred­i­ta­tion of Aca­d­e­mic and Voca­tional Qual­i­fi­ca­tions and Hong Kong Insti­tute of Education.

As some­one who has spent about half of his life liv­ing and work­ing in the US and the other half in Hong Kong, Pro­fes­sor Ko was keenly aware of the impor­tance of being able to work com­fort­ably and effec­tively across cul­tures. He cre­ated many cross-cultural learn­ing expe­ri­ences for CityU and HKUST stu­dents, includ­ing con­duct­ing work­shops on inter­cul­tural com­mu­ni­ca­tion him­self. He also pub­lished 7 books and numer­ous arti­cles on a wide range of edu­ca­tional issues in both Eng­lish and Chi­nese since return­ing to Hong Kong in 1998.
 
Source: http://chtl.hkbu.edu.hk/sources/ProfKoBio.pdf

In Memoriam: Jeffrey S. Beck (1962–2012)

Jef­frey Scott Beck

Jef­frey Scott Beck, Ph.D, passed away on April 7, 2012, with his wife, his sis­ter, his mother-in-law and close friends at his side. He was 49. It is with great sor­row that we mourn his unex­pected and quite too early departure.

Jeff was born on Octo­ber 23, 1962 to Irwin and Leila Beck in Brook­lyn, New York. He was a vibrant ball of fire with the ded­i­ca­tion and intel­lect to make an ever last­ing impact in our soci­ety. He earned his doc­tor­ate in Inor­ganic Chem­istry from the Uni­ver­sity of Penn­syl­va­nia in 1989, true to his high school pre­dic­tion. Jeff was a cre­ative and pro­lific inven­tor, an inspi­ra­tional leader, a devoted hus­band and friend, and a renowned sci­en­tist and engi­neer in his field. The loves of his life were his wife Lisa and sis­ter Shari, game-changing inno­va­tion, art col­lec­tion, and his dogs Pharaoh and Monty.

Jeff’s pro­fes­sional career began at Mobil’s Cen­tral Research Lab­o­ra­tory, imme­di­ately fol­low­ing his Ph. D.  Through­out his career, Jeff made out­stand­ing con­tri­bu­tions to the dis­cov­ery and com­mer­cial­iza­tion of novel cat­a­lysts and processes for the pro­duc­tion of key petro­chem­i­cals and clean fuels. His col­leagues describe Jeff as an inspi­ra­tional vision­ary who had the uncanny abil­ity to see where the puck was going to be. His ground­break­ing research on “liquid-crystal tem­plat­ing” led to the dis­cov­ery of an entirely new class of tun­able meso­porous mate­ri­als, M41S, with pore sizes in the range of 16 to 100 Å.  This dis­cov­ery is rec­og­nized as a major inno­va­tion in the sci­en­tific com­mu­nity and has spawned a new field of mate­ri­als chem­istry. Tech­nolo­gies based on Jeff’s inno­v­a­tive and prac­ti­cal inven­tions also rev­o­lu­tion­ized the pro­duc­tion of key petro­chem­i­cals, includ­ing para-xylene (used in the pro­duc­tion of poly­ester fiber and PET plas­tics), via advanced cat­a­lysts and processes.  Jeff was rec­og­nized for his excel­lence in catal­y­sis and mate­ri­als with numer­ous national and inter­na­tional awards, includ­ing the National Acad­emy of Engi­neer­ing (one of the high­est pro­fes­sional dis­tinc­tions accorded an engi­neer), the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Society’s Houdry Award (accorded to the most sig­nif­i­cant con­trib­u­tor to indus­trial catal­y­sis), the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Society’s Heroes of Chem­istry Award, and the Inter­na­tional Zeo­lite Association’s Breck Award (accorded to the most sig­nif­i­cant advance in the field of micro-and meso-porous mate­ri­als).  He was author of nearly 75 US patents, pub­lished pro­lif­i­cally, and fre­quently deliv­ered invited lec­tures at acclaimed uni­ver­si­ties and con­fer­ences world­wide.  Jeff left an indeli­ble mark not only in research, where he led ExxonMobil’s pres­ti­gious Cor­po­rate Strate­gic Research, but also in sev­eral assign­ments in the busi­ness, includ­ing Tech­ni­cal Man­ager at the Bay­town Refin­ery, and Poly­eth­yl­ene Global Mar­ket­ing Manager.

Though taken from this world quite too soon, Jeff’s loved ones can find com­fort in know­ing that he lived his life fully and the way he wanted. He demanded excel­lence, did not sit still for medi­oc­rity, and inspired all who were for­tu­nate enough to come to know him. Jeff found his hap­pi­est moments spend­ing time with his beloved wife Lisa, and his dogs Pharaoh and Monty. His fam­ily, friends, and col­leagues will remem­ber him as a remark­able indi­vid­ual. He has taken in his early jour­ney a part of each of us. We feel blessed to have had him with us. Jeff is sur­vived by his wife Lisa, par­ents Irwin and Leila, sis­ter Shari, and brother Richard.

Please share sym­pa­thies, mem­o­ries, and con­do­lences online at www.mem.com.
In lieu of flow­ers, Lisa has requested that dona­tions be made to Best Friends Ani­mal Soci­ety, www.bestfriends.org, or any other ani­mal res­cue organization.

Southwest Catalysis Society Spring Symposium

The South­west Catal­y­sis Soci­ety will hold its Annual Spring Sym­po­sium at the Rice Uni­ver­sity McMurtry Audi­to­rium in Hous­ton on April 20, 2012. Reg­is­tra­tion begins at 8:00 AM. For reg­u­lar mem­bers, reg­is­tra­tion is $50, which includes the dues to NACS. Reg­is­tra­tion for stu­dents is only $10.

To see a map of the venue: http://www.artshound.com/venue/detail/666
There is a Cen­tral Park­ing Garage at the inter­sec­tion of Loop Rd. and Alumni Rd., only a few blocks away.

This annual, regional meet­ing pro­vides a forum where catal­y­sis in its var­i­ous forms — het­ero­ge­neous to homo­ge­neous, com­pu­ta­tional to exper­i­men­tal, sur­face sci­ence to mate­ri­als syn­the­sis, applied to fun­da­men­tal, aca­d­e­mic to indus­trial — can be dis­cussed. Please make plans to attend. We have an excit­ing lineup of invited speak­ers as well as many poster presentations.

Con­firmed speak­ers include:

  • Carl Mesters, Shell Oil
  • C. Bud­die Mullins, UT, Austin
  • David Artrip, Cat­alytic Con­sul­tants — A Con­ver­sa­tion about Entre­pre­neur­ing in Catalysis
  • Raghu Menon, Albemarle
  • Mahdi Abu-Omar, Purdue
  • Max Tir­towid­jojo, Dow– Effi­cient Pro­duc­tion of High Purity Phe­no­lic Gly­col Ethers

Addi­tion­ally, spon­sor­ship oppor­tu­ni­ties as well as exhi­bi­tion tables are also avail­able. If you or your com­pany would like to spon­sor a por­tion of the SWCS 2012 Annual Sym­po­sium or have catalysis-related exhibits to dis­play that would be of inter­est to the mem­ber­ship, please con­tact John Novak at john.novak@basf.com for more information.