North American Catalysis Society Awards and Process

Awards presented by the North American Catalysis Society

 
The North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety spon­sors six pres­ti­gious awards and lec­ture­ships to rec­og­nize the accom­plish­ments of catal­y­sis sci­en­tists and to pro­mote the advance­ment of catal­y­sis sci­ence in North Amer­i­ca and world-wide. These awards are described in the NACS web site (http://www.nacatsoc.org/awards_desc.asp).

Three of these awards include ple­nary lec­tures at NACS bian­nu­al meet­ings (Eugene J. Houdry Award in Applied Catal­y­sis, Paul H. Emmett Award in Fun­da­men­tal Catal­y­sis, Michel Boudart Award for the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis, the lat­ter joint­ly pre­sent­ed with the Euro­pean Fed­er­a­tion of Catal­y­sis Soci­eties). The F.G. Cia­pet­ta and Robert Bur­well Lec­ture­ships in Catal­y­sis involve lec­tures at local club meet­ings and the pre­sen­ta­tion of the awards at the NACS meet­ing ban­quet. The NACS Award for Dis­tin­guished Ser­vice in the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis is the most recent recog­ni­tion insti­tut­ed by the Soci­ety. All of these awards are pre­sent­ed every two years and the nom­i­na­tion dead­lines are list­ed in the NACS web site.

Canvassing and Nomination Processes

 
NACS encour­ages all nom­i­na­tions for these awards and nom­i­na­tors and nom­i­nees need not be NACS mem­bers. The Pres­i­dent instructs the Vice Pres­i­dent to form a can­vass­ing com­mit­tee for each cycle of every award to ensure a full slate of out­stand­ing can­di­dates. This com­mit­tee is led by the NACS Vice-Pres­i­dent and con­sists of pre­vi­ous award recip­i­ents and rec­og­nized experts with­in the catal­y­sis com­mu­ni­ty at-large. The com­mit­tee iden­ti­fies wor­thy can­di­dates and its Chair seeks nom­i­na­tors for these can­di­dates, but pro­vides no spe­cif­ic guid­ance about the prepa­ra­tion of the nom­i­na­tion pack­ages beyond that pro­vid­ed on the NACS web site. The Chair also instructs the Sec­re­tary to con­tact all NACS local rep­re­sen­ta­tives to request that they can­vass for nom­i­na­tions with­in their local sec­tions. All nom­i­na­tion dead­lines and cycles are also announced in the quar­ter­ly NACS newslet­ter.

Award Recipient Nomination Process

 
The jury that selects each NACS award recip­i­ent con­sists of sci­en­tists and engi­neers rec­og­nized as experts and rep­re­sent­ing indus­try, acad­e­mia, and nation­al labs. The mem­bers of this jury must have no affil­i­a­tion with any of the nom­i­nees and are specif­i­cal­ly asked to dis­close any con­flicts of inter­est and to dis­qual­i­fy them­selves with­out prej­u­dice when a con­flict exists. The selec­tion jury is appoint­ed by the NACS Pres­i­dent, who seeks guid­ance in select­ing its mem­bers from the Vice Pres­i­dent and from senior mem­bers of the catal­y­sis com­mu­ni­ty. The iden­ti­ty of the jury mem­bers is kept in the strictest con­fi­dence and known only to the Pres­i­dent; the mem­bers are also required to keep their par­tic­i­pa­tion in these com­mit­tees con­fi­den­tial.

The NACS Pres­i­dent pro­vides the jury with the nom­i­na­tion pack­ages for all can­di­dates with­in two weeks of the dead­line; in the inter­ven­ing time, poten­tial jury mem­bers are asked about their will­ing­ness to serve. The mem­bers of the jury rank the can­di­dates and pro­vide spe­cif­ic details for their selec­tion in the case of the top three can­di­dates. In some cas­es, jury mem­bers are asked to again rank the top two can­di­dates side-by-side, after con­sid­er­ing their respec­tive nom­i­na­tion pack­ages once again.

The recip­i­ent of the Award and his/her nom­i­na­tors are informed of the deci­sion of the jury, fol­lowed by noti­fi­ca­tion of jury mem­bers and of nom­i­na­tors of the oth­er can­di­dates. A for­mal announce­ment, com­posed by the Pres­i­dent in con­sul­ta­tion with the recip­i­ent and the nom­i­na­tor, is pub­lished in the NACS web site and the NACS newslet­ter and soon there­after in Chem­i­cal and Engi­neer­ing News. The awards are all pre­sent­ed at the bien­ni­al NACS meet­ing, where the respec­tive cita­tions are read and the award win­ners receive a plaque.

The NACS com­mu­ni­ty at-large deserves con­grat­u­la­tions and thanks for the excel­lent cadre of nom­i­nees that it has put forth and cho­sen and for their ded­i­ca­tion as nom­i­na­tors and as mem­bers of the jury.
 
Thanks,
 
Enrique Igle­sia
Pres­i­dent
 
Bruce Cook
Vice Pres­i­dent

7th International Symposium on Acid-Base Catalysis (ABC‑7)

On behalf of the orga­niz­ing com­mit­tee, I am pleased to announce the 7th Inter­na­tion­al Sym­po­sium on Acid-Base Catal­y­sis (ABC‑7), which will be held from May 12 to May 15,  2013 at Shi­na­gawa, Tokyo, Japan.

The ABC is a suc­cess­ful series of sym­posia. The 7th ABC will pro­vide a forum for sci­en­tists and engi­neers from both acad­e­mia and indus­try to dis­cuss most recent devel­op­ments and tech­no­log­i­cal oppor­tu­ni­ties in this vibrant area of research as well as the past ABC sym­posia, pro­mot­ing a glob­al and inter­dis­ci­pli­nary approach towards both fun­da­men­tal sci­ence and indus­tri­al appli­ca­tions of acid-base catal­y­sis. We hope many peo­ple engag­ing in the acid-base catal­y­sis field par­tic­i­pate in ABC‑7.

The sci­en­tif­ic activ­i­ties of the sym­po­sium will be held at TKP Gar­den City Shi­na­gawa, which is in front of Shi­na­gawa Sta­tion in Tokyo. This area has good access to Nari­ta Inter­na­tion­al Air­port (total time: 70~80 min.) and Hane­da Air­port (Tokyo Inter­na­tion­al air­port) (total time: 15~20 min.).

On detailed infor­ma­tion on abstract sub­mis­sion, reg­is­tra­tion, access to the con­fer­ence venue, and sci­en­tif­ic pro­grams, please vis­it our web­site. http://www.shokubai.org/abc/index.html

Please note the dead­line for abstract sub­mis­sion is Novem­ber 16, 2012.

Now you can find the titles of Ple­nary and Keynote Lec­tures on the web­site. We look for­ward to meet­ing you at the sym­po­sium.
 
Best regards,
 
Takashi Tat­su­mi
Chair­man of ABC‑7
 
Michikazu Hara
Gen­er­al sec­re­tary of ABC‑7

Travel Grants for Attendance at the International Congress on Catalysis

The Soci­ety grate­ful­ly acknowl­edged the finan­cial sup­port of DOE, NSF, BASF, BP, Süd-Chemie, and Dow for trav­el sup­port for catal­y­sis researchers from the Unit­ed States, Cana­da and Mex­i­co to attend the ICC meet­ing in Munich.

Trav­el assis­tance was pro­vid­ed to:

  • Young fac­ul­ty in a tenure-track posi­tion (Aditya Bahn, Cathy Chin, Phillip Christo­pher, Steven Cross­ley, Lars Grabow, Simon Pod­kolzin, Carsten Siev­ers, Yyriy Roman)
  • Post-doc­tor­al fel­lows (David Fla­her­ty, Mon­i­ca Gar­cia, Raja­mani Gounder, Jan Kopy­scin­s­ki, Alexan­der Okrut, Far­naz Sotood­eh, Alek­san­dra Vojvod­ic).
  • Grad­u­ate stu­dents, all of whom received par­tial sup­port from the indus­tri­al spon­sor and car­ried a named fel­low­ship des­ig­na­tion:
    1. BASF Fel­lows (Andrew Fos­ter, Samia Ilias, Amber Jan­da, Matthew Mon­te­more, Simon Pang, Natal­ie Ray, Di Wu)
    2. BP Fel­lows (Maria Ter­an and Vic­to­ria Whif­f­en)
    3. Dow Fel­lows (Matthew Bouch­er, John Copeland, Shan­non Klaus, Wen-Sheng Lee, Michael Nigra, Jing Lu, and Dario Pri­eto).

The selec­tion com­mit­tee mem­bers were Jing­guang Chen (Chair), Bruce Cook, Enrique Igle­sia and Israel Wachs.

2012 Eni Prize to Catalysis Researcher

Professor Enrique Iglesia

Pro­fes­sor Enrique Igle­sia

Pro­fes­sor Enrique Igle­sia has received the 2012 Eni Prize “New Fron­tiers of Hydro­car­bons” for the devel­op­ment of hydro­car­bon syn­the­sis cat­a­lysts which improve process effi­cien­cy and reduce waste and ener­gy use.
 
Please use the links below for addi­tion­al infor­ma­tion:
 
2012 Eni Awards
Press Releas­es
2012 Win­ners
Prof. Igle­sia Biog­ra­phy

International Precious Metals Institute Henry J. Albert Award to Professor Fabio Ribeiro

Pro­fes­sor Fabio Ribeiro of the Depart­ment of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Pur­due Uni­ver­si­ty has been named the recip­i­ent of the 2012 Inter­na­tion­al Pre­cious Met­als Insti­tute Hen­ry J. Albert Award, spon­sored by BASF Cor­po­ra­tion, in recog­ni­tion of his out­stand­ing the­o­ret­i­cal and exper­i­men­tal con­tri­bu­tions to the sci­ence and tech­nol­o­gy of pre­cious met­als. His research group com­bines mea­sure­ments on real­is­tic dis­persed clus­ters and flat mod­el sys­tems with pre­ci­sion and reli­a­bil­i­ty at the state-of-the-art. He has pro­vid­ed the kinet­ic data set for water-gas shift that rep­re­sents the stan­dard used by oth­ers in bench­mark­ing of oth­er mate­ri­als and of the­o­ret­i­cal esti­mates. This work has also demon­strat­ed the strong effects of sup­ports in the acti­va­tion of water in water-gas shift and that all exposed sur­face atoms are active on Pt clus­ters but only cor­ner atoms with low coor­di­na­tion are active on Au clus­ters. His sem­i­nal stud­ies of NOx reac­tions have unveiled the mech­a­nism of NO oxi­da­tion and pro­vid­ed ele­gant exam­ples of the use of spec­tro­scop­ic and kinet­ic tools in unrav­el­ing the com­plex path­ways in NOx trap­ping on Ba-pro­mot­ed Pt/alumina sys­tems. His group con­tin­ues to expand the exper­i­men­tal fron­tiers with recent devel­op­ments X‑ray absorp­tion spec­troscopy dur­ing catal­y­sis at high pres­sures in liq­uid and gaseous media, with infrared analy­sis of adsorbed species dur­ing iso­topic tran­sients, and with state-of-the-art envi­ron­men­tal trans­mis­sion elec­tron microscopy. These suc­cess­es build on his ear­li­er stud­ies of Pd cat­a­lysts which defined the reac­tion path­ways involved in cat­alyt­ic com­bus­tion of methane and in cat­alyt­ic hydrodechlo­ri­na­tion of a wide range of hydrochlo­ro­flu­o­ro­car­bon mol­e­cules.

 

In Memoriam: Michel Boudart (1924–2012)

Michel Boudart, chem­i­cal engi­neer and expert in catal­y­sis, dies at 87 Pro­fes­sor Boudart taught at Prince­ton and Berke­ley but was best known for his five decades at the heart of the Depart­ment of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Stan­ford. His influ­ence shaped catal­y­sis dur­ing the post-­-war peri­od when ener­gy, defense and space indus­tries demand­ed a deep­er under­stand­ing of chem­i­cal reac­tions.
 
By Andrew Myers
 
Michel Boudart, a pro­fes­sor emer­i­tus of chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing at Stan­ford Uni­ver­si­ty and for five decades one of the world’s lead­ing experts in catal­y­sis, died May 2 at an assist­ed liv­ing cen­ter in Palo Alto, Cal­i­for­nia, of mul­ti­ple organ fail­ure. He was 87.

Boudart was the first William M. Keck, Sr. Pro­fes­sor of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing and one of a very few indi­vid­u­als who were respon­si­ble for estab­lish­ing the rep­u­ta­tion of Stanford’s chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing depart­ment. The cen­tral theme of his research was the cat­alyt­ic prop­er­ties of met­als, par­tic­u­lar­ly small met­al par­ti­cles.

Boudart essen­tial­ly brought catal­y­sis, as a sci­ence, to chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing in the Unit­ed States. He was an inter­na­tion­al ambas­sador for the field over his entire career.

Michel Boudart was a world renowned and influ­en­tial expert in the field of catal­y­sis who brought the Stan­ford Uni­ver­si­ty chem­i­cal engi­neer­ing to promi­nence and trained sev­er­al decades of stu­dents,” said Andreas Acrivos, a fel­low pro­fes­sor at Stan­ford and now pro­fes­sor emer­i­tus both at Stan­ford and at the City Col­lege of CUNY. “He left a lega­cy that would be dif­fi­cult to repli­cate.”

As a pro­fes­sor, Boudart super­vised what was con­sis­tent­ly one of the larg­er groups of PhD can­di­dates in the depart­ment, even­tu­al­ly guid­ing over 70 doc­tor­al can­di­dates to their degrees and men­tor­ing over 100 post-­-doc­tor­al can­di­dates and vis­it­ing sci­en­tists. The dias­po­ra of his for­mer stu­dents would go on to lead and shape the field.

Le plus de saveur

 
An avid inter­na­tion­al trav­eller, Boudart and his wife, Mari­na, boast­ed friends across the world. His office sport­ed Japan­ese sho­ji screens, abstract prints, and over­stuffed sofas and – occu­py­ing one entire wall – an immense peri­od­ic table of the ele­ments, print­ed in Russ­ian, which he read with ease.

In a brief biog­ra­phy, Boudart cit­ed as his per­son­al phi­los­o­phy a quote from French lit­er­ary the­o­rist Roland Barthes: “Nul pou­voir, un peu de savoir, un peu de sagesse, et le plus de saveur pos­si­ble.” Trans­lat­ed loose­ly, it reads: “No pow­er, a lit­tle knowl­edge, a lit­tle wis­dom, and as much fla­vor as pos­si­ble.” In this con­text, he will always be remem­bered as a man of real per­son­al charis­ma and, one of the last “gen­tle­man sci­en­tists.”

Catal­y­sis is the study of chem­i­cal process­es by which one sub­stance, the cat­a­lyst, pro­motes a reac­tion between oth­er sub­stances with­out itself chang­ing.
It is fun­da­men­tal to the chem­i­cal, petro­le­um and phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal indus­tries, among many oth­ers.

In the post-­-war era, the Unit­ed States became the acknowl­edged leader in the field, most­ly owing to advances flow­ing out of Amer­i­can acad­e­mia and indus­try. Boudart was at the cen­ter of it all. He was an unabashed cham­pi­on of catal­y­sis. Though the field is obscure to most lay audi­ences, catal­y­sis has a pro­found impact on our world and how we live.

In a pub­lished inter­view, Boudart once laid out his case: With­out catal­y­sis, he said, “[o]ur satel­lites could not be maneu­vered, our autos would pour out all the nox­ious chem­i­cals we’ve spent years guard­ing against. Our tele­phone links with the rest of the world would be seri­ous­ly imped­ed.”

In 1975, in the wake of the first oil cri­sis, Boudart and two asso­ciates found­ed Cat­alyt­i­ca in San­ta Clara, Cal­i­for­nia, which worked on high­ly com­plex cat­alyt­ic prob­lems for petro­chem­i­cal, chem­i­cal, and phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal firms as well as gov­ern­ment agen­cies. He served as a con­sul­tant to numer­ous well-­-known com­pa­nies.

[Cat­alyt­i­ca] start­ed in the catal­y­sis con­sult­ing field, a ser­vice made clear­ly nec­es­sary by the oil cri­sis,” Boudart said at the time. “One of the crit­i­cal areas was in syn­thet­ic fuels.”

Guid­ing force
Acco­lades and awards were show­ered on Boudart through­out his life, but par­tic­u­lar­ly in the lat­er years of his career, when the scale of his impact became clear.

In 1985, the Uni­ver­si­ty of Utah host­ed a five-­-day sym­po­sium on catal­y­sis sole­ly in Boudart’s hon­or. In 2004, the Jour­nal of Phys­i­cal Chem­istry ded­i­cat­ed an entire issue to Boudart’s lega­cy.

In their intro­duc­tion, the journal’s edi­tors wrote, “Michel Boudart has been the guid­ing force in the field of het­ero­ge­neous catal­y­sis for more than forty years. He was known for ele­gant­ly stat­ed con­cepts and his elu­ci­da­tion of cat­alyt­ic sites, his exper­i­men­tal stud­ies of new cat­alyt­ic mate­ri­als, and the activ­i­ties of [his] many stu­dents and col­lab­o­ra­tors …”

The jour­nal cit­ed his fore­most achieve­ment as the quan­tifi­ca­tion of catal­y­sis as rig­or­ous sequences of ele­men­tary steps. He focused atten­tion on the need to report reac­tion rates eval­u­at­ed under the most rig­or­ous assess­ment tech­niques avail­able and he intro­duced the con­cept of turnover rate – the num­ber of mol­e­cules con­vert­ed per site per sec­ond. He then per­fect­ed pre­cise pro­to­cols for accu­rate mea­sure­ment of reac­tions.

Boudart’s insis­tence on rig­or­ous col­lec­tion and report­ing of data proved invalu­able in com­par­ing data gen­er­at­ed by dif­fer­ent lab­o­ra­to­ries through­out the world and enabled many sub­se­quent advances in the field. His vision, lead­er­ship, and wis­dom were cred­it­ed as a major force in bring­ing catal­y­sis to a point where the design of spe­cif­ic cat­alyt­ic mate­ri­als for envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion, pro­duc­tion of chem­i­cals, and ener­gy con­ver­sion process­es became pos­si­ble.

In 2006, the Dan­ish com­pa­ny Hal­dor Top­søe spon­sored The Michel Boudart Award for the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis, which is admin­is­tered joint­ly by the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety and the Euro­pean Fed­er­a­tion of Catal­y­sis Soci­eties.

Profound legacy

 
Michel Boudart was born on 18 June 1924 in Brus­sels, Bel­gium. In 1940, as Hitler’s Panz­er divi­sions blitzkrieged his home­land, Boudart was just 16. He had been accept­ed to the Uni­ver­si­ty of Lou­vain, but the uni­ver­si­ty was closed due to the war.

In order not to be draft­ed or sent to Ger­man fac­to­ries, Boudart worked as a vol­un­teer stretch­er-­-bear­er for the Red Cross. Mean­while, he had pri­vate tutor­ing to pre­pare for Lou­vain. When the uni­ver­si­ty reopened, Boudart grad­u­at­ed in three years at the top of every class, save math­e­mat­ics, where he was out­done only by his dear friend, the late Pro­fes­sor Rene de Voge­laere of the Uni­ver­si­ty of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley.

Boudart earned his B.S. at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Lou­vain in 1944 and his M.S. in 1947. He then left Bel­gium to attend Prince­ton Uni­ver­si­ty, where he took his PhD in chem­istry in 1950. “He and his wife Mari­na were born in Bel­gium and were knight­ed by the crown, but Amer­i­ca was their adopt­ed home,” said Acrivos. “Their chil­dren are thor­ough­ly Amer­i­can.”

After earn­ing his doc­tor­ate, Boudart held fac­ul­ty posi­tions at Prince­ton until 1961 and, for three years, at Berke­ley, before join­ing the Stan­ford fac­ul­ty in 1964. He was Chair of the Depart­ment of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Stan­ford from 1975 to 1978. He also held vis­it­ing pro­fes­sor­ships at the Uni­ver­si­ties of Lou­vain, Rio de Janeiro, Tokyo, and Paris. He became pro­fes­sor emer­i­tus in 1994.

Boudart authored or coau­thored over 280 jour­nal arti­cles and served on the edi­to­r­i­al boards of at least ten jour­nals. His book, Kinet­ics of Chem­i­cal Process­es, is a stan­dard ref­er­ence and was trans­lat­ed into Japan­ese, Span­ish, and French. His book, Kinet­ics of Het­ero­ge­neous Cat­alyt­ic Process­es, writ­ten with G. Dje­ga-­-Mari­adas­sou, was pub­lished in French in 1982 and trans­lat­ed to Eng­lish in 1984. He was coed­i­tor-­- in-­-chief of Catal­y­sis Sci­ence and Engi­neer­ing, a series of twelve vol­umes.

Boudart was recip­i­ent of numer­ous awards, among them the Wil­helm Award in Chem­i­cal Reac­tion Engi­neer­ing from the Amer­i­can Insti­tute of Chem­i­cal Engi­neers (1974), the Kendall Award (1977) and the Mur­phee Award (1985) from the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Soci­ety, and the Chem­i­cal Pio­neer Award (1991) of the Amer­i­can Insti­tute of Chemists.

His elec­tion to both the Nation­al Acad­e­my of Sci­ence and the Nation­al Acad­e­my of Engi­neer­ing were reflec­tions of Boudart’s lead­er­ship and his sci­en­tif­ic grav­i­tas. He was like­wise a Fel­low of the Amer­i­can Asso­ci­a­tion for the Advance­ment of Sci­ence, the Amer­i­can Acad­e­my of Arts and Sci­ences, and the Cal­i­for­nia Acad­e­my of Sci­ences. He was a for­eign mem­ber of the Acad­e­mia Royale des Sci­ences, des Let­tres et des Beaux-­-Arts de Bel­gique and its Roy­al Bel­gian Acad­e­my Coun­cil for Applied Sci­ences.

Boudart received hon­orary doc­tor­ates from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Liege, the Uni­ver­si­ty of Notre Dame, the Uni­ver­si­ty of Ghent, and the Insti­tut Nation­al Poly­tech­nique de Lor­raine.

He held four patents

 
Boudart is sur­vived by a daugh­ter, Iris Har­ris, of Whit­ti­er, Calif.; three sons, Marc, of Aptos, Calif.; Bau­douin, of Ather­ton, Calif; and Philip, of Palo Alto; and grand­chil­dren Mari­na and Clint Har­ris; and Jesse, Louise, and Noel­la Boudart. His wife, Mari­na d’Haese Boudart, died in 2009. A sec­ond daugh­ter, Dominique, died in child­hood.
 
Down­load PDF doc­u­ment: Michel Boudart Obit­u­ary

John Armor is the recipient of the 2012 NACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Catalysis

John Armor

Dr. John N. Armor has been select­ed as the recip­i­ent of the 2012 NACS Award for Dis­tin­guished Ser­vice in the Advance­ment of Catal­y­sis. The Award is pre­sent­ed every two years to rec­og­nize an indi­vid­ual who has advanced cat­alyt­ic chem­istry or engi­neer­ing through both sig­nif­i­cant ser­vice to the catal­y­sis com­mu­ni­ty and out­stand­ing tech­ni­cal accom­plish­ments. This award includes an hon­o­rar­i­um ($5,000) and a plaque. It is award­ed by the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety and spon­sored by Exxon­Mo­bil and Clari­ant and will be pre­sent­ed dur­ing the 2013 NAM in Louisville.

This award rec­og­nizes Dr. Armor’s ded­i­ca­tion to the catal­y­sis com­mu­ni­ty through his lead­er­ship in the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety, the New York Acad­e­my of Sci­ences, and the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Soci­ety and in the orga­ni­za­tion of inter­na­tion­al sym­posia and con­fer­ences. He has served the North Amer­i­ca Catal­y­sis Soci­ety as Pres­i­dent and Trea­sur­er for more than two decades and dur­ing his tenure strength­ened the finan­cial and tech­ni­cal under­pin­nings of the Soci­ety, the qual­i­ty and rig­or or its meet­ings, and the scope and reach of its edu­ca­tion­al activ­i­ties. He has brought enhanced recog­ni­tion to mem­bers of the Soci­ety and a brighter future to the dis­ci­pline through his artic­u­late advo­ca­cy of catal­y­sis and his lead­er­ship in strength­en­ing the involve­ment of stu­dents and young prac­ti­tion­ers in the activ­i­ties of the Soci­ety.

Dr. Armor has served the com­mu­ni­ty well as a teacher and as a vision­ary leader, while con­tribut­ing as an inde­pen­dent sci­en­tist and a suc­cess­ful men­tor and research man­ag­er in indus­tri­al set­tings. His tech­ni­cal con­tri­bu­tions have been rec­og­nized with the Eugene J. Houdry Award of the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Soci­ety and with the E. V. Mur­phree Award of the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Soci­ety. He has served as Edi­tor of Applied Catal­y­sis and Cat­Tech and has served on the edi­to­r­i­al board of the lead­ing jour­nal in catal­y­sis. He has authored many com­pre­hen­sive reviews of cat­alyt­ic tech­nolo­gies, often with insight­ful his­tor­i­cal per­spec­tives and always with a clear strate­gic vision.

 

In Memoriam: Edmond I. Ko (1952–2012)

Edmond Ko

“Edmond Ko was Direc­tor of the Cen­ter for Engi­neer­ing Edu­ca­tion Inno­va­tion and Adjunct Pro­fes­sor of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at The Hong Kong Uni­ver­si­ty of Sci­ence and Tech­nol­o­gy (HKUST). Pri­or to that, he served as Vice- Pres­i­dent (Under­grad­u­ate Edu­ca­tion), Dean of Stu­dents, and Pro­fes­sor (Chair) of Chem­istry at City Uni­ver­si­ty of Hong Kong (CityU), and as the Vice Provost for Edu­ca­tion and Pro­fes­sor of Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing at Carnegie Mel­lon Uni­ver­si­ty. Pro­fes­sor Ko received his B.S. in Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Wis­con­sin-Madi­son and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Chem­i­cal Engi­neer­ing from Stan­ford Uni­ver­si­ty. He worked as a Research Fel­low at the Cor­po­rate Research Lab­o­ra­to­ry of Exxon (1975–76) and held vis­it­ing and guest fac­ul­ty appoint­ments at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley (1987–88), the Hong Kong Uni­ver­si­ty of Sci­ence and Tech­nol­o­gy (1995), Cal­i­for­nia Insti­tute of Tech­nol­o­gy (1996) and Tian­jin Uni­ver­si­ty (since 2002).

Besides being the co-author of over 100 pub­li­ca­tions and co-inven­tor of one U.S. patent in the area of sur­face sci­ence and catal­y­sis, Pro­fes­sor Ko was an accom­plished edu­ca­tor. He received nine teach­ing awards in his career, includ­ing the William H. and Frances S. Ryan Teach­ing Award at Carnegie Mel­lon, the Chem­i­cal Man­u­fac­tur­ers Asso­ci­a­tion Nation­al Cat­a­lyst Award, the W. M. Keck Foun­da­tion Engi­neer­ing Teach­ing Excel­lence Award, the W. E. Wick­enden Award of the Amer­i­can Soci­ety for Engi­neer­ing Edu­ca­tion, and the School of Engi­neer­ing Teach­ing Award at HKUST.

Pro­fes­sor Ko had nine years of aca­d­e­m­ic admin­is­tra­tive expe­ri­ence, with the first two at Carnegie Mel­lon and the last sev­en at CityU. As the key per­son charged to improve edu­ca­tion at these two insti­tu­tions, he direct­ed activ­i­ties in stu­dent recruit­ment and admis­sions, stu­dent devel­op­ment, stu­dent res­i­dence, cur­ricu­lum design, qual­i­ty assur­ance, and fac­ul­ty devel­op­ment. He was par­tic­u­lar­ly inter­est­ed in devel­op­ing an out­come-based approach to enhance stu­dent learn­ing.

Serv­ing as Chair­man of the Cur­ricu­lum Devel­op­ment Coun­cil and a mem­ber of the Qual­i­ty Assur­ance Coun­cil of the Uni­ver­si­ty Grants Com­mit­tee, Edu­ca­tion Com­mis­sion, and Advi­so­ry Com­mit­tee on Teacher Edu­ca­tion and Qual­i­fi­ca­tions of the HKSAR Gov­ern­ment, Pro­fes­sor Ko was deeply involved in the for­mu­la­tion and imple­men­ta­tion of edu­ca­tion poli­cies in Hong Kong at all lev­els. He was also a coun­cil mem­ber of the Hong Kong Coun­cil for Accred­i­ta­tion of Aca­d­e­m­ic and Voca­tion­al Qual­i­fi­ca­tions and Hong Kong Insti­tute of Edu­ca­tion.

As some­one who has spent about half of his life liv­ing and work­ing in the US and the oth­er half in Hong Kong, Pro­fes­sor Ko was keen­ly aware of the impor­tance of being able to work com­fort­ably and effec­tive­ly across cul­tures. He cre­at­ed many cross-cul­tur­al learn­ing expe­ri­ences for CityU and HKUST stu­dents, includ­ing con­duct­ing work­shops on inter­cul­tur­al com­mu­ni­ca­tion him­self. He also pub­lished 7 books and numer­ous arti­cles on a wide range of edu­ca­tion­al issues in both Eng­lish and Chi­nese since return­ing to Hong Kong in 1998.
 
Source: http://chtl.hkbu.edu.hk/sources/ProfKoBio.pdf

In Memoriam: Jeffrey S. Beck (1962–2012)

Jef­frey Scott Beck

Jef­frey Scott Beck, Ph.D, passed away on April 7, 2012, with his wife, his sis­ter, his moth­er-in-law and close friends at his side. He was 49. It is with great sor­row that we mourn his unex­pect­ed and quite too ear­ly depar­ture.

Jeff was born on Octo­ber 23, 1962 to Irwin and Leila Beck in Brook­lyn, New York. He was a vibrant ball of fire with the ded­i­ca­tion and intel­lect to make an ever last­ing impact in our soci­ety. He earned his doc­tor­ate in Inor­gan­ic Chem­istry from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Penn­syl­va­nia in 1989, true to his high school pre­dic­tion. Jeff was a cre­ative and pro­lif­ic inven­tor, an inspi­ra­tional leader, a devot­ed hus­band and friend, and a renowned sci­en­tist and engi­neer in his field. The loves of his life were his wife Lisa and sis­ter Shari, game-chang­ing inno­va­tion, art col­lec­tion, and his dogs Pharaoh and Mon­ty.

Jeff’s pro­fes­sion­al career began at Mobil’s Cen­tral Research Lab­o­ra­to­ry, imme­di­ate­ly fol­low­ing his Ph. D.  Through­out his career, Jeff made out­stand­ing con­tri­bu­tions to the dis­cov­ery and com­mer­cial­iza­tion of nov­el cat­a­lysts and process­es for the pro­duc­tion of key petro­chem­i­cals and clean fuels. His col­leagues describe Jeff as an inspi­ra­tional vision­ary who had the uncan­ny abil­i­ty to see where the puck was going to be. His ground­break­ing research on “liq­uid-crys­tal tem­plat­ing” led to the dis­cov­ery of an entire­ly new class of tun­able meso­porous mate­ri­als, M41S, with pore sizes in the range of 16 to 100 Å.  This dis­cov­ery is rec­og­nized as a major inno­va­tion in the sci­en­tif­ic com­mu­ni­ty and has spawned a new field of mate­ri­als chem­istry. Tech­nolo­gies based on Jef­f’s inno­v­a­tive and prac­ti­cal inven­tions also rev­o­lu­tion­ized the pro­duc­tion of key petro­chem­i­cals, includ­ing para-xylene (used in the pro­duc­tion of poly­ester fiber and PET plas­tics), via advanced cat­a­lysts and process­es.  Jeff was rec­og­nized for his excel­lence in catal­y­sis and mate­ri­als with numer­ous nation­al and inter­na­tion­al awards, includ­ing the Nation­al Acad­e­my of Engi­neer­ing (one of the high­est pro­fes­sion­al dis­tinc­tions accord­ed an engi­neer), the North Amer­i­can Catal­y­sis Society’s Houdry Award (accord­ed to the most sig­nif­i­cant con­trib­u­tor to indus­tri­al catal­y­sis), the Amer­i­can Chem­i­cal Society’s Heroes of Chem­istry Award, and the Inter­na­tion­al Zeo­lite Association’s Breck Award (accord­ed to the most sig­nif­i­cant advance in the field of micro-and meso-porous mate­ri­als).  He was author of near­ly 75 US patents, pub­lished pro­lif­i­cal­ly, and fre­quent­ly deliv­ered invit­ed lec­tures at acclaimed uni­ver­si­ties and con­fer­ences world­wide.  Jeff left an indeli­ble mark not only in research, where he led ExxonMobil’s pres­ti­gious Cor­po­rate Strate­gic Research, but also in sev­er­al assign­ments in the busi­ness, includ­ing Tech­ni­cal Man­ag­er at the Bay­town Refin­ery, and Poly­eth­yl­ene Glob­al Mar­ket­ing Man­ag­er.

Though tak­en from this world quite too soon, Jef­f’s loved ones can find com­fort in know­ing that he lived his life ful­ly and the way he want­ed. He demand­ed excel­lence, did not sit still for medi­oc­rity, and inspired all who were for­tu­nate enough to come to know him. Jeff found his hap­pi­est moments spend­ing time with his beloved wife Lisa, and his dogs Pharaoh and Mon­ty. His fam­i­ly, friends, and col­leagues will remem­ber him as a remark­able indi­vid­ual. He has tak­en in his ear­ly jour­ney a part of each of us. We feel blessed to have had him with us. Jeff is sur­vived by his wife Lisa, par­ents Irwin and Leila, sis­ter Shari, and broth­er Richard.

Please share sym­pa­thies, mem­o­ries, and con­do­lences online at www.mem.com.
In lieu of flow­ers, Lisa has request­ed that dona­tions be made to Best Friends Ani­mal Soci­ety, www.bestfriends.org, or any oth­er ani­mal res­cue orga­ni­za­tion.

Southwest Catalysis Society Spring Symposium

The South­west Catal­y­sis Soci­ety will hold its Annu­al Spring Sym­po­sium at the Rice Uni­ver­si­ty McMurtry Audi­to­ri­um in Hous­ton on April 20, 2012. Reg­is­tra­tion begins at 8:00 AM. For reg­u­lar mem­bers, reg­is­tra­tion is $50, which includes the dues to NACS. Reg­is­tra­tion for stu­dents is only $10.

To see a map of the venue: http://www.artshound.com/venue/detail/666
There is a Cen­tral Park­ing Garage at the inter­sec­tion of Loop Rd. and Alum­ni Rd., only a few blocks away.

This annu­al, region­al meet­ing pro­vides a forum where catal­y­sis in its var­i­ous forms — het­ero­ge­neous to homo­ge­neous, com­pu­ta­tion­al to exper­i­men­tal, sur­face sci­ence to mate­ri­als syn­the­sis, applied to fun­da­men­tal, aca­d­e­m­ic to indus­tri­al — can be dis­cussed. Please make plans to attend. We have an excit­ing line­up of invit­ed speak­ers as well as many poster pre­sen­ta­tions.

Con­firmed speak­ers include:

  • Carl Mesters, Shell Oil
  • C. Bud­die Mullins, UT, Austin
  • David Artrip, Cat­alyt­ic Con­sul­tants — A Con­ver­sa­tion about Entre­pre­neur­ing in Catal­y­sis
  • Raghu Menon, Albe­mar­le
  • Mah­di Abu-Omar, Pur­due
  • Max Tir­towid­jo­jo, Dow- Effi­cient Pro­duc­tion of High Puri­ty Phe­no­lic Gly­col Ethers

Addi­tion­al­ly, spon­sor­ship oppor­tu­ni­ties as well as exhi­bi­tion tables are also avail­able. If you or your com­pa­ny would like to spon­sor a por­tion of the SWCS 2012 Annu­al Sym­po­sium or have catal­y­sis-relat­ed exhibits to dis­play that would be of inter­est to the mem­ber­ship, please con­tact John Novak at john.novak@basf.com for more infor­ma­tion.